Posts Tagged ‘beginnings’

Beginnings (More)

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January 13th, 2019 Posted 7:50 am

On Sunday we’ve been doing beginnings – all the Peter Abrahams novels, including those written under Spencer Quinn. Here, from 1982, #2 – TONGUES OF FIRE.

[This fascinating story relates very plausibly to our age and time. It is gripping.”
– Bestsellers]

It was the night Israel died.

It was night as bright as day.

It could have been day, on another planet where the sky was red and purple and green; where the clouds were balls of orange and yellow fire; where the ground never stopped trembling; where there was no air to breathe, only smoke and dust, cordite and oil, shrapnel and blood.

It could have been a colossal experiment to drive rats crazy; but people, not rats went mad. The rats would go on as they always did.

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Beginnings (We Start a New Year)

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January 6th, 2019 Posted 8:37 am

On Sundays we do beginnings – the openings of all the Peter Abrahams novels and short stories, including those written under the Spencer Quinn pen name. Today we go all the way back to book one – THE FURY OF RACHEL MONETTE (1980). The first book is a big adventure. Can you really actually write a novel that makes sense? Maybe even enjoyable for the reader? When we got to the last paragraph – which had already been in our mind for weeks – we got a feeling that’s hard to describe.

[“The Fury of Rachel Monette may be one of the best books out this year…visual, frightening, fast-paced and mesmerizing. Its author is a natural-born artist, a brilliant young writer who has a truly remarkable talent for writing psychological thrillers of enormous power, depth and intensity.”
– The Denver Post]

It was one of those winds that have a name. The chergui they called it, a hot summer wind that blew from the east. At dawn it was already gathering strength, picking the crests off the dunes and driving the sand through the air like sparks from a grindstone.

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Beginnings (More)

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December 9th, 2018 Posted 8:25 am

On Sundays we do beginnings – the openings of all the Peter Abrahams novels and short stories, including those written under the Spencer Quinn pen name. Today we go all the way back to book one – THE FURY OF RACHEL MONETTE (1980). The first book is a big adventure. Can you really actually write a novel that makes sense? Maybe even enjoyable for the reader? When we got to the last paragraph – which had already been in our mind for weeks – we got a feeling that’s hard to describe.

[“The Fury of Rachel Monette may be one of the best books out this year…visual, frightening, fast-paced and mesmerizing. Its author is a natural-born artist, a brilliant young writer who has a truly remarkable talent for writing psychological thrillers of enormous power, depth and intensity.”
– The Denver Post]

It was one of those winds that have a name. The chergui they called it, a hot summer wind that blew from the east. At dawn it was already gathering strength, picking the crests off the dunes and driving the sand through the air like sparks from a grindstone.

 

 

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Beginnings (More)

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December 2nd, 2018 Posted 7:42 am

On Sundays we’ve been doing beginnings – all the Peter Abrahams books in chronological order, including those written under the Spencer Quinn pen name. Now we’re onto the short stories. There are 4 Chet and Bernie short stories, all available digitally. The fourth – so timely! – is SANTA 365, in which Chet and Bernie encounter – or maybe personify? – the Christmas spirit. And for newcomers – the C&B series can be read in any order, no problem. If you want to start with the next one (HEART OF BARKNESS, coming July 2), feel free!

“There’s no Santa Claus,” Charlie said.

“Who told you that?” said Bernie.

“Esmé.”

“Who’s Esmé?”

“At school.”

“Well,” said Bernie, “everyone has their own opinion.”

“It’s not an opinion, Dad,” said Charlie. “It’s a scientific fact.”

“Oh?”

“From a scientist.”

“Any scientist in particular?”

“Groucho Marx.”

“Esmé told you that?”

“Uh-huh.”

“Know much about Groucho Marx?”

Charlie shrugged his skinny little shoulders. “He was a scientist and he said there ain’t no Santa Claus.”

“What do Esmé’s parents do?”

“Drive her to school. Pick her up.”

“I meant for a living.”

“Like you’re a private eye?”

“Yeah. Like that.”

“I don’t think they’re private eyes,” Charlie said.

“Why not?”

“They’re rich.”

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The Books



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