Posts Tagged ‘B. Stover’

Monkey in TO FETCH A THIEF

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July 1st, 2015 Posted 8:00 am

B. Stover was puzzled by a reference in yesterday’s post to a monkey scene in TO FETCH A THIEF. Yes, a puzzle for sure, seeing as there is no such scene. But a baboon plays a role:

I ran onto the loading dock. Still some light left and I could see Peanut clearly. She was on the ground, walking toward the perp’s old – what was the word? – jalopy. That was it. She walked over to the jalopy, lifted one of her huge round feet and stomped down, crushing the whole front end. Why? I had no idea, but I liked it, liked it a whole lot. Then Peanut raised her trunk high and blew a beautiful trumpeting sound up toward the darkening sky. I loved that trumpeting sound – as good as Roy Eldridge or better – and was hoping for more, when the baboon blew right by me with a whoosh of air, flew out into the night and disappeared from view, although not before I saw that he had the sombrero.

I jumped down onto the ground and went over to Peanut. This was the Peanut Case, meaning she was my responsibility. First I had to get her attention. That probably meant waiting until she’d finished crushing the jalopy’s back end. It didn’t take long.

 

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Sugar Saga

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February 26th, 2015 Posted 8:03 am

Here’s the missing Sugar. A strange urban sort of story, Admin says, probably only posted today because he’s fond of the word “bonkers.” (Maybe B. Stover will have something etymological to say.)

http://nypost.com/2015/02/25/dog-walker-loses-womans-pit-bull-after-meltdown/

022415sugar6CR

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Stovernia

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April 25th, 2012 Posted 8:09 am

“No baseball in Stovernia?” Spence says.

“That’s going to be tough,” says Admin. “A jailable offense, I believe. But we can drown our sorrows in Cahors.”

“It’s a dictatorship, I take it?”

“I believe so.”

“Benevolent?”

“As long as a certain someone never hears the crack of the bat. Grammatical and syntactical errors aren’t taken lightly, either.”

“So – ‘He slud into third’ would be very bad?”

“The worst.”

Welcome Kiwi and Hazel.

Happy Birthday Ben! And many many more!

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Even More Background

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December 3rd, 2010 Posted 9:01 am

“Oops,” says Bernie. “We forgot to look this over yesterday. It’s from B. Stover. And speaking of B. Stover, I wonder what she’d think of the misuse of ‘begging the question’, just everywhere these days. Came across it last night in The Voice, the new Sinatra bio I was otherwise enjoying.”

Begging? Begging for treats is bad. I know that very very well and would never ever do it intentionally.

From B. Stover:

1. Col. Bob met his son, Ray Jason, after Ray followed him in his car. This was in Bakersfield. Col. Bob gave Ray $300 from his ATM. We don’t know what either said to the other except that Ray hates Col. Bob.

2. Astrid is missing and according to Bernie, Ray is also missing.

3. For some reason (a “hunch”?) Bernie thought that he could get info on Astrid from Albie Rose in Vegas and he goes there and questions Albie. Albie wants to hire Bernie, who will have none of that. Albie was married to Tiffany who changed her name from Ethel which was an alias for Astrid. Foster first saw her at a show as Ethel the Ready. Albie is very jealous, asks why Foster knew Tiffany 3 was really Ethel. Albie was married eight times.

4. Foster, dressed in all black, comes to Bernie’s house. He wants to sell Bernie information about Astrid; he knows nothing about Ray. He does not want to work for Albie any longer and has a new gig in LA. He says that Astrid/Tiffany 3 liked Albie and that Albie was wrong about the other dude.

5. Bernie and Chet are meeting with Foster in an unfinished housing development somewhere, I think, in the desert near Vegas. The housing development for some reason has windowless houses. Foster trusts Bernie and I think Bernie feels sorry for Foster.

6. Bernie has not told Foster or Albie who his client is. He has given Foster $1.000 and we will apparently learn next what Foster knows, probably a very tenuous assumption.

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The Books



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